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Dog Parks in Baltimore

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Dogs playing at Canton Dog Park in Baltimore.

Dogs playing at Canton Dog Park in Baltimore.

Photo by Libby Zay

Dog parks in Baltimore are urban oasis's for pets and their owners where dogs can run around off leash in safe and secure environments. With so many animal lovers in the area, it's not a surprise that many neighborhoods have special spots dedicated to dog lovers. All of these spots are legal areas for dogs to get some exercise and socialize.

Locust Point Dog Park at Latrobe Park
The southeast corner of Latrobe Park (behing the basketball courts) near 1627 E. Fort Ave., Federal Hill
Of all the dog parks in Baltimore, Locust Point Dog Park at Latrobe Park is like a playground for your pup. The off-leash dog park is full fenced and inside dogs will be delighted to find an AstroTurf hill with a fallen log and even a water feature that resembles a stream (it's also not unusual for someone to donate a kiddie pool for the dogs to splash around in on hot summer days). There are also plenty of benches for dog owners to sit and read or soak in the sun and parking is ample, making the drive well worth it. Volunteers help clean up the park and also host "Yappy Hours" at local bars. The park is free and open to the public and no pre-approval of licensing/vaccination is required.

Canton Dog Park
Intersection of South Bouldin and Toone Streets, Canton
This fenced dog park has two separate areas: one for large and another for small or older dogs. No matter what the size, your pets will have plenty of room to frolic and play off-leash with other dogs, but keep in mind there aren't any agility areas for the pets (it's more like a fenced-in yard where dogs can have a meet and greet). There's a water source outside the park for drinking water, and a few benches and trees for the owners to get some rest or shade. The park is privately funded, running solely on donations from individuals and the time and services of volunteers. The park is free and open to the public and no pre-approval of licensing/vaccination is required.

Paw Point Dog Park at Robert E. Lee Park
1000 Lakeside Dr.
This fenced, one-acre dog park is located within Robert E. Lee Park, a large natural area with multiple trails and waterfront space. The dog park itself is equipped with benches and bag dispensers for cleanup. Anyone can enjoy Robert E. Lee Park with their dogs free of charge (as long as the dogs are leashed), but Paw Point requires pre-approval (including proof of vaccinations) and a $35 per year membership. Members receive a code to get through a double-gated entrance.

Howards Park Dog Park
600 N. Howard St.
The newest dog park on the Baltimore scene is this off-leash park in Midtown. Organizers constructed a temporary fence in June 2012, and construction on making the park more permanent was scheduled to begin in late 2013. The park is always open and always free; a shed contains dog park supplies.

Baltimore Animal Recreation Center (BARC) Park at Hannah More
12035 Reisterstown Rd.
BARC Park at Hannah More is Baltimore County's first dog park. The area includes a 1.5-acre area for large dogs and a 0.75-acre area for small dogs to exercise, relax, socialize, and have fun. Both enclosed areas include water fountains. Area dog lovers work with the Reisterstown Department of Recreation and Parks to monitor the park, which is available for use with proof of immunization and a $25 annual family membership.

Dog Park Etiquette
Each dog park comes with its own set of rules, but here are some general tips for pet owners:

  • All dogs should be fully immunized with tags on their collars. If a dog shows signs of sickness or fleas, ticks, worms, or other parasites, keep them out of the park.
  • Aggressive dogs are not allowed and any dog showing aggressive behavior should be removed immediately.
  • Refrain from bringing bones and treats into the park, as these can trigger aggression. Frisbees and balls are generally accepted.
  • Never leave your dog unattended under any circumstance.
  • Pick up after your pet. This includes cleaning up and disposing of feces left by your dog.
  • No dogs in heat are allowed and some parks require animals be spayed/neutered.
  • Consider leaving the park if your dog shows signs of stress or engages in inappropriate play activity, such as bullying, mounting, snapping, cornering, or biting.

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